March 24 2018 03:11 PDT

Gallery of the Rotunda, Library of Congress, LC-D4-13499

Gallery of the Rotunda, Library of Congress


since 01.01.06

Citation Information for “Thomas Aquinas, ‘The Five Ways’”

This page is not intended to be original or authoritative. The page is a summary of some main points and associated notes on the topic. Undoubtedly, there are scholarly and authoritative sources, both primary and secondary which ought be cited rather than these notes.

However if you find the page of use, your citation should meet the style requirements of the publication for which you are submitting your paper. In general, the current page may be cited in this manner:

Archie, Lee C, "Thomas Aquinas, ‘The Five Ways,’" Philosophy of Religion (June 26, 2006) URL=<>.

Users might find the following references to formats for bibliographic citation helpful:

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“The origin of religious belief is something of a mystery, but in recent years scientists have started to make suggestions. One leading idea is that religion is an evolutionary adaptation that makes people more likely to survive and pass their genes onto the next generation. In this view, shared religious belief helped our ancestors form tightly knit groups that cooperated in hunting, foraging and childcare, enabling these groups to outcompete others. In this way, the theory goes, religion was selected for by evolution, and eventually permeated every human society.” Michael Brooks, "Born Believers: How Your Brain Creates God," New Scientist (04 February 2009) No. 2694.

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This page last updated 08/29/12
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