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Philosophy Worksheets

Suggestion: Take your time and read each step carefully; confusion can easily ensue by skipping or skimming instructions.


Web Practice Worksheet

Question Response
1. Open your Internet browser (e.g., Internet Explorer or Netscape). Enter the address: http://philosophy.lander.edu/ in the Address or Location Bar. ( Note that there is no www in the address.) This page is the Homepage for some philosophy courses. What is the title of the page as shown in the title bar at the very top of the screen? (The page title is usually followed by the name of the browser.)  
2. Click on the link OTHER SERVICES at the top of the page. When the Other Services page loads, click on the Majordomo Mailing List Archive for this class. When the Mailing List Interface page loads, scroll down to the bottom of the page to browse the Archives. What is the first message of this semester? (Hint: click on [INDEX] for this month.)  
3. Go back to the Philosophy Homepage and click on the Homepage for this class. When the Homepage loads, click on the Majordomo Mailing List icon for this class. When that page loads, join the Mailing List by entering your email address and clicking ``Submit Query.'' Q.v., the instructions for joining the Discussion List in the syllabus under the section entitled ``Course Requirements.'' What kinds of messages can be posted to the Mailing List?  
Question Response
4. Check your email for a message with the subject ``Majordomo Results.'' Where do you send your authorization code in order to authenticate your email address? Send your authorization code as the first line in the message to the address specified; you should get an email confirmation in a moment. (Be sure to have no blank lines, spaces, or typed characters in front of the authorization code, and be sure the message is sent as plain text.)  
5. Click on the red ``p.l.e'' icon at the top left of the page and so return to the Philosophy Homepage. Click on OTHER SERVICES at the top of the page. When the ``Other Services'' page loads, click on the Majordomo Mailing List ``subscribe/unsubscribe'' link. When the MajorCool Mail List Manager loads, type in your email address and click the yellow ``Go'' button. If a ``no subscribed list'' page loads, repeat step 4. Otherwise, scroll down the Mailing Lists listed. What Mailing List Names have a check in the SUB (i.e., Subscription) column?  
6. Using the instructions from the mwforum Message Board section under ``Course Requirements'' for this syllabus, register and log in to the Philosophy Forum Message Board for this class. What is the title of the first message of the semester? Post a message in the Discussion area by clicking in the following order: Intro. to Phil. $\rightarrow$ Class Discussion $\rightarrow$ Post Topic. In the Subject bar, enter an appropriate title and as a message tell what aspects or aspect of scientific reasoning you are interested in learning about.  
Question Response
7. On the Philosophy Homepage, under the gray heading ``Courses of Study,'' click on the yellow title of your philosophy course. When the page for your philosophy course loads, click the ``FAQ'' (Frequently Asked Questions) for your course. Can you exempt the final exam? Can you make up a missed quiz?  
8. Find the title for the first lecture of this course. What is the title of the lecture as it appears in the title bar at the very top of the screen?  
9. Find the title for the first sample quiz in this course. What is the title as it appears in the title bar at the very top of the screen?  
10. From the Homepage of your philosophy course, click on the ``Chat'' link. Enter your ``Nick'' (your screen name or nickname), your real name, and hit the ``Enter'' key. At the bottom of the window is an unnamed message bar. Type in ``Hi.'' What is the name that appears in the Chat Window with the message you just typed in?  
11. Find the philosophy search engine called Hippas. Search for the term ``a priori.'' What is the definition of this term given by the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy? If Hippas is offline, use the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  
12. Open your email client and send the following message to the mailing list for this class in accordance with the email guidelines listed in the ``Requirements'' section of this syllabus. In the body of the message, state your major, your hometown, your class standing (Freshman, etc.), and your career interests. Be sure to sign your name in accordance with the guidelines before you send the message.  

Exercise on Statements

Directions: Which of the following sentences are statements?


  1. The flower of Echinacea purpurea (the purple coneflower) is a useful stimulant.



  2. The interior of a conch shell and the outside of a pine cone can be described by the Fibonacci numbers.



  3. Planet X exists beyond Pluto.



  4. The number of degrees of the exterior angle of any triangle is equal to the sum of the two opposite interior angles.



  5. Although it hasn't been proved beond a reasonable doubt, frustration causes aggression.



  6. The mathematical theory of topology can adequate describe any sculpture.



  7. The universe cotains intelligent extra-terrestrial life.



  8. Carefully remove the precipitate from the centrifuge tube.



  9. Friday, January 24, was a great day.



  10. Why shouldn't I make a 3.0 GPA this semester?



  11. President Roosevelt knew about the attack on Pearl Harbor in advance.



  12. Next season, there will be only five major hurricanes.



  13. "We murder to dissect." (Wordsworth, "The Tables Turned")



  14. A freely falling body accelerates rapidly.



  15. Twins are two in number.

Diagramming Arguments

Directions: First study the passages below and state whether or not each is an argument. If it is not, state why not. Second, if the passage is an argument, state whether it is inductive or deductive. Third, if the passage is an argument, diagram its structure using the numbers provided.

(1) Cranberry juice helps kidney infections (2) because persons who drink cranberry juice often do not get many kidney infections.  
   
   
   
(2) No one has directly observed a chemical bond, (2) so scientists who try to envision such bonds must rely on experimental clues and their own imaginations.  
   
   
   
(3)Be careful who you pretend to be for (2) that you will surely become.  
   
   
   
(4)If we are open to our experience, then (2) doing what "feels right" proves to be a competent and trustworthy guide to behavior which is truly satisfying.  
   
   
   
(5) One of the reasons why Planet X may not have been found in the past is (2) previous surveys concentrated on the Northern Hemisphere while (3) recent calculations show that Planet X, if it exists, is more likely to be found in the Southern Hemisphere.  
   
   
   
(6) Some students absent today are unprepared for this test, since (2) the law of averages dictates that only 10% of students are absent due to illness, and (3) more than 10% are absent.  
   
   
   
(7) Joe has creased earlobes and a depressed sternum and (2) these characteristics have been associated with heart attacks, so (3) Joe probably will have heart problems in the future.  
   
   
   
(8) If we concentrate on the response we must make when we see a light, we react faster than if we fix out attention on the light itself. (2) Thus, our attitude or expectation influences the speed of our reactions.  
   
   
   
(9) Because the apparent daily movement which is common to both the planets and the fixed stars is seen to travel from the east to the west, but (2) the far slower single movements of the single planets travel in the opposite direction from west to east, (3) is is therefore certain that these movements cannot depend on the common movement of the world but should be assigned to the planets themselves.  
   
   
   
(10) If students were environmentally aware, they would object to the endangering of any species of animal. (2)The well-known Greeenwood white squirrel has become endangered as (3) it has disappeared from the Lander Campus (4) because the building of the library destroyed its native habitat. (5) No Lander students objected. (6) Thus, Lander students are not environmentally aware. (Hint: c.f., modus tollens)  
   
   
   


Exercises on Emotive Significance

Directions: Restate each of the following emotively neutral descriptions of personality by (1) positively slanted descriptions and (2) negatively slanted descriptions in the spaces below. If you want to consult a thesaurus, try the online Meriam-Webster Collegiate Thesaurus at http://www.m-w.com/home.htm or Roget's Thesaurus at http://humanities.uchicago.edu/forms_unrest/ROGET.html or http://www.bartleby.com/62/.


+ + +
     
     
     
0 talkative 0 shy 0 intelligent
     
- - -
     
     



+ + +
     
     
     
0 cautious 0 friendly 0 idealistic
     
- - -
     
     



+ + +
     
     
     
0 practical 0 untidy 0 thoughtful
     
- - -
     
     




Exercise on Inductive Reasoning

Write a biography of the man who stated the following quotation. Include dates, education, religion, temperament, politics, culture, and so forth. Spend at least twenty minutes on this assignment by careful analysis and speculation.
If he really does think there is no distinction between virtue and vice, why, Sir, when he leaves our houses let us count our spoons.


Exercises on Disagreements

Directions: In each of the following interactions (1) state the fact at issue in emotively neutral language, and (2) identify the kinds of agreement or disagreement present.
  1. John: Adam is a skilled conversationalist.
    Mary: No, he is an endless chatterbox.
    Fact at Issue:
    John's emotive significance:
    Mary's emotive significance:
    Belief:
    Attitude:
  2. John: Betty is a free and innovative thinker.
    Mary: Well, in my opinion, Betty doesn't pay attention to the ideas of others.
    Fact at Issue:
    John's emotive significance:
    Mary's emotive significance:
    Belief:
    Attitude:
  3. John: Bobby kindly offered twenty dollars, money he can ill-afford to donate.
    Mary: Bobby hinted he would give only twenty dollars, the cheapskate.
    Fact at Issue:
    John's emotive significance:
    Mary's emotive significance:
    Belief:
    Attitude:
  4. John: Little Susie tells her stories with innovative and creative interpretations.
    Mary: You've got to be kidding--you call "lying" creative?
    Fact at Issue:
    John's emotive significance:
    Mary's emotive significance:
    Belief:
    Attitude:
  5. John: Senator James's address to the committee ran on and on at the hearing.
    Mary: No way. He maintained a sullen muteness at the meeting.
    Fact at Issue:
    John's emotive significance:
    Mary's emotive significance:
    Belief:
    Attitude:


Exercise on Definitions

Directions: Identify the type of definition in each of the following passages.
  1. Vitamins are vital nutrients that the body cannot produce on its own. Even minute deficiencies of these compounds produce characteristic disroders. (Wendy Gibbons, "Vitamin or Just Vital?'" Science News, Vol. 139, No. 21, 332.)


  2. In the research report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Shaywitz and her coauthors define dyslexia as a discrepancy score representing the difference between actual reading achievement and achievement predicted on the basis of measures of intelligence. (Anne Marshall Huston, "Debating Dyslexia," Science News, Vol. 141, No. 11, 171.)


  3. Did I detect a slight simile between the lines of "The diagnostic deluge" ...? In that spirit, I would like to propose another addition to the guide to mental disorders. I call it DAD, for Disorder Addition Disorder, which seems to afflict those compiling mental disarder manuals. (Thomas D. Moder, "Why7 Not Add DAD?," Science News, Vol 141, No. 11, 171.)


  4. Vanderbilt and Jerry Tersoff ... call their new 168-carbon molecule buckygym because of its repeating, jungle-gym-like structure. Using a computer program, they constructed the buckygym by substituting seven-sided rings of carbon where fullerenes typically have five-sided rings: Six-sided rings surround each seven-sided ring, and each six-sided ring is surrounded by alternating six- and seven-sided rings. (E. Pennisi, "Theorists Design New-Look Fullerenes," Science News, Vol. 41, No. 6, 85.)


  5. Naturalistic means glorifying all the meanness of human nature and the wordiness of human existence, emphasizing the disgusting, crude, animal part of human nature. (Jerry Coss, The New Guide to Religious Endeavour, 235.)



next up previous contents index
Next: Informal Fallacy Paper Up: COURSE SYLLABUS Philosophy 203: Previous: Example Test and Quiz   Contents   Index
Lee Archie 2003-01-18