Return to Philosophy Web Homepagephilosophy.lander.edu       Title: Introduction to Logic

Homepage > Logic > Frequently Asked Questions         

   
 

Logic Homepage

 

Quizzes
Tests
FAQ
Links
Search
Readings
Archives
Syllabus

 

 

Philosophy 103: Introduction to Logic
Frequently Asked Questions
2005 Spring Only

Table of Contents

  1. What is the purpose of this course?
  2. What kinds of things are studied?
  3. Is Introduction to Philosophy a prerequisite for this course? Does this course fulfill any University requirements?  I've been trying to register for this course since my freshmen year.  Why don't you offer more sections of Logic? 
  4. My advisor says this course does not fulfill the Humanities General Elective Requirement.  Why not? It's a philosophy course.

The course is a survey of traditional logic, including classical and contemporary logic.  Special emphasis is given to the structure of arguments, the nature of language, and the logic of reasoning.  The specific aims of this introductory survey of logic are
[1] to gain an appreciation for the complexity of language,
2] to learn effective methods of resolution for a variety of disagreements,
[3] to obtain the ability to define terms,
[4] to understand the structure of different kinds of arguments,
[5] to recognize and evaluate different kinds of arguments,
[6] to grasp the features of traditional logic,
[7] to sketch some principles of symbolic logic,
[8] to obtain some facility in symbolic manipulations,
[9] to develop the ability to think critically, and
[10] to realize that the proper use of logic is a reasonable way to solve problems.

The Lander University Catalog description of Introduction to Logic is given in the Philosophy Course Listing on the Department of History and Philosophy Website.


Philosophy 103: Introduction to logic has the following goals:

[1] to solve selected problems which illustrate basic logical principles,
[2] to read carefully and critically the text and some papers on logic,
[3] to write analytically about  logical theory,
[4] to test your understanding by means of special tests and projects, and
[5] to question critically several interpretations of introductory logic.

In this course you will learn the difference between an argument and an explanation, the difference between deduction and induction, and the differences among truth, validity, and soundness in argumentation. You will learn effective methods of analysis and criticism as well as learn the basis of the construction of arguments.


3. Is Introduction to Philosophy a prerequisite?  Does this course fulfill any University requirements? I've been trying to register for this course since my freshmen year.  Why don't you offer more sections of Logic?

Introduction to Logic has no prerequisite.  This course complements Philosophy 102: Introduction to Philosophy but you need not have taken that course to do well in the Introduction to Logic course. They are entirely independent courses.

Philosophy 103: Introduction to Logic  meets the Logical and Analytical Thought elective for many majors.

Several schools and divisions of the University have recently required Logic to fulfill specific course requirements.  The curriculum changes resulted in a large number of students needing logic for graduation.  We are now offering seven sections of logic each year.  At present, most freshman and sophomores should be able to register for the class.

 

Your advisor is correct--Philosophy 103:  Introduction to Logic does not meet the Humanities General elective requirement. 

This logic course is sometimes confused with Philosophy 102: Introduction to Philosophical Inquiry, which does meet the Humanities elective requirement. 

Philosophy 103: Introduction to Logic does, however,  meet the Logical and Analytical Thought elective for many majors.

Return to Logic Homepage    

 
Index: FAQ   Top of Page   Index: FAQ

Send corrections or suggestions to webmaster@philosophy.lander.edu
Read the disclaimer concerning this page.
11.22.04        
2004  Licensed under GFDL


Arguments | LanguageFallacies  | Propositions  | Syllogisms  | Translation  | Symbolic

.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]