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Citation Information for “Plato, ‘Myth of Gyges.’”

This page is not intended to be original or authoritative. The page is a summary of some main points and associated notes on the topic. Undoubtedly, there are scholarly and authoritative sources, both primary and secondary which ought be cited rather than these notes.

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Archie, Lee C, "Plato, ‘Myth of Gyges,’" Introduction to Philosophy (December, 24, 2006) URL=<http://philosophy.lander.edu/intro/gyges.shtml>.

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“The mental experiment applies the paradigmatic myth of Gyges and his right to human conduct at large.… What would a man do if social sanctions were removed and there were no problems of spiritual and moral order? The hypothesis formulates a real problem because there are, indeed, phases in history, the periods of crisis, where internal and external controls break down to such an extent that an appreciable number of persons in a society can live, in various degrees of realization, as it were in the dream of their desires.“ Eric Voegelin et al., Order and History: Plato and Aristotle (Columbia Missouri: University of Missouri Press, 1999), 130-1.

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